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A 20 Year Old’s Genius Invention Could Rid The Ocean Of Plastic Pollution

August 20, 2015 | No Comments » | Topics: Uncategorized

Slat invented a way to rid oceans of damaging plastic refuse. It sounds rather far-fetched, but when you hear more about his invention, you'll understand why his project is garnering so much support.

While most 20-year-olds are spending their time drinking, partying, and figuring out their lives, Boyan Slat is hell-bent on cleaning up the world’s oceans.

At present, plastic waste in the oceans congregate within five rotating currents, or gyres, scattered throughout the world.

Slat's plan is to place enormous floating barriers in rotating tidal locations around the globe (called gyres), and let the plastic waste naturally flow into the structure. By not using traditional nets, he avoids putting wildlife at risk. Instead, he plans to employ the use of V-shaped buffers anchored by floating booms.

Slat’s plan is to place enormous floating barriers in rotating tidal locations around the gyres, and let the plastic waste naturally flow into the structure. By not using traditional nets, he avoids putting wildlife at risk. Instead, he plans to employ the use of V-shaped buffers anchored by floating booms.

Slat's plan is to place enormous floating barriers in rotating tidal locations around the globe (called gyres), and let the plastic waste naturally flow into the structure. By not using traditional nets, he avoids putting wildlife at risk. Instead, he plans to employ the use of V-shaped buffers anchored by floating booms.

Because plastic is buoyant, the barriers would essentially funnel them above the water’s surface, making extraction and disposal a lot easier.

Slat's company, called Ocean Cleanup, states that the currents will flow underneath barriers, easily trapping garbage in its path.

The barriers are approximately 6,500 feet long, and they’re storm resistant. They are the longest floating structures ever placed in the ocean.

The barriers are approximately 6,500 feet long, and they're storm resistant. They are the longest floating structures ever placed in the ocean.

It’s a passive system that seems very simple, but in reality, The Ocean Cleanup has worked with 100 volunteer scientists and engineers to confirm that it is, indeed, a feasible and cost-effective method to rid the seas of garbage.

The barriers are approximately 6,500 feet long, and they're storm resistant. They are the longest floating structures ever placed in the ocean.

This campaign started as a crowdfunded project, and over time, it’s raised $2 million. In fact, it has been dubbed the largest maritime clean-up in history and is already set for deployment in 2016.

This campaign started as a crowdfunded project, and over time, it's raised $2 million. Now that the project has picked up steam, more and more people are beginning to take notice.

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